A sensationally unique dark comedy …(the Osbornes) bring to life the quintessential nineties apathetic Everyman in a hilarious, but somewhat foreboding, tale …memorable fantasy sequences make this parable about the devastating impact of mass media on the collective consciousness of society an extremely amusing slice of Everyman’s life.
— Trevor Groth, The Sundance Film Festival

The trailer for the Osborne Brothers' Sundance live-action feature film debut DROPPING OUT.


Depressed by life, a young man decides to end it all. However, a word of warning - never try to videotape your suicide in LA, because you don't know who will crawl out of the woodwork to 'help you'. The first feature from Academy Award Nominated filmmaker Mark Osborne, written by and staring Kent Osborne (the two-time Emmy Award winning writer of Spongebob Squarepants and Adventure Time), is a dark comedy wrapped in the Technicolor world of TV and pop culture.

The film premiered as an Official Selection at the Sundance Film festival in 2000, and went on to receive festival awards including: Best Feature Film at the 2000 Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival in Birmingham, AL, Best Feature Film at the 2000 Savanah Film and Video Festival, Audience Prize at the 2000 Micro-Cine Fest in Baltimore, MD. 


"…acidically lampooned…a funny and sobering send up…Special praise to screenwriter Kent Osborne for the observantly odd writing " – The Hollywood Reporter

" …an impressive showing with a smart, carefully modulated dissection of the manias bred by pop media imagery. " – Variety

“(At Sundance 2000, regarding distribution deals) the most heart wrenching spectacle of a deb leaving a ball still looking for love was DROPPING OUT, the most stylistically accomplished of the indie comedies that have been coming out these last few years.” – The Film Festival Reporter

"a brilliant, satiric look at the worlds of independent filmmaking and Hollywood …truly the creepiest comedy I have seen in years, I laughed my ass off. " – Chris Gore, Film Threat

"a deadpan-laced, pop-culture driven, self-referential, black humor-drenched masterpiece …the humor is right on, the dialogue is witty and the visual nuances are amazing…a surreal view of suburban lassitude and cultural dependence on television …off-the wall brilliant …deserves to be seen by a wider audience . If a studio doesn't pick this up, then the powers that fuel Hollywood really are collectively idiotic. " - IGN.com

"utterly original… a wonderfully creative film…should appeal to a mass audience too…the ultimate post-modern Catch-22…brilliant." – Eric D. Snider

"a brilliant black comedy…jaw dropping… The script and lead performance are also dryly hilarious." – Box Office Magazine

"has all the satirical verve of The Simpsons…inventive and layered with brilliance." - Austin Chronicle

"cleverly spoofs the media's obsession with reality programming…Osborne delivers a standout performance." – Austin American Statesman

“filled with absurdist touches, cruel-spirited parody and bravura fantasy sequences…recalls in tone and texture works by Albert Brooks and John Waters…outstanding…brilliant…the tone is so withering and the performances so focused on deadpan that the humor imbues that bleak disturbing feel of Albert Brooks' "Lost in America" or Martin Scorsese's "King of Comedy"…the scenario is ripe for the sardonic skewering of all things Hollywood and the Osbornes wickedly oblige.” - David Pelfrey, Black and White

"a sharp satire of the media and how far they are willing to go to get the perfect moment." – News Channel 2000

"one of the funniest and most meaningful dark comedies since Happiness…the film takes every opportunity to take on America's obsession with fake reality (better known as "reality based television shows")… a must see…The performances were great. The direction was great. The script was great. The entire damn film was great. It is a must see. It is brilliant." – FilmCritic.com

"dark, foreboding and very funny… John Stamos ("Full House") and Adam Arkin ("Northern Exposure” and "Chicago Hope") play gut-busting supporting roles." – Holland Sentinel



Director: Mark Osborne
Producers: Neil Machlis, Michelle Imperato-Stabile, Steve Kalafer
Writer: Kent Osborne
Executive Producer: Daniel L. Stillman
Director of Photography: Brian Capener
Editors: Kris Cole, John Venzon
Production Designer: Diane Yates
Music Supervisor: Jack Pendarvis
Costume Design: Greg LaVoi
Make-Up and Hair: Suzan Kaminga
Production Manager: Jonny Vasic
First Assistant Director: John O'Rourke

Emile: Kent Osborne
Henry: David Koechner
Andrew: Vince Vieluf
Scott Kayle: Adam Arkin
Ronnie: John Stamos
Wendy: Katey Sagal
Paul Blanchard: Fred Willard
Doctor: Doug Savant
Mellissa: Jennifer Elise Cox
Bob: Dylan Haggerty
Heather: Sasha Barrese
Alicia:Aimee Graham
Betty Brockton: Mary Scheer
Baby Emile: Madison Osborne
'Weird Al' Yankovic as Himself